Fill 1

41

Score

64

Region

Central Asia

Persecution Type

Dictatorial paranoia

Religion

Islam

Persecution Level

Very High

Population

18,777,000

Christian

4,852,000

Government

Presidential Republic

Leader

President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev

Profile of Persecution

Violence 2.4/16.7
Church Life 13.4/16.7
National Life 12.5/16.7
Community Life 11.0/16.7
Family Life 11.5/16.7
Private Life 13.2/16.7

What does persecution look like in Kazakhstan? What is life like for Christians?

Persecution in Kazakhstan hasn’t changed much over the years. Legislation dating back to September 2011 restricts the ability to worship freely. Kazakhstan’s government has steadily increased its control over religious expression in the country, which means increased surveillance, raids on church meetings and arrests. It uses the threat of militant Islam to restrict more freedoms.

Russian Orthodox churches experience the fewest problems from the government because they do not usually attempt to evangelize the Kazakh population. It is the Kazakh Christians from a Muslim background who bear the worst persecution, both at the hands of the state and from family, friends and community. Some converts are locked up by their families for long periods, beaten and may eventually be expelled from their communities. Local mullahs also preach against them.

In short, pressure is high for Christians across the board. Muslim families, friends and villagers put pressure on converts, while the government imposes many restrictions on the functioning of Christian churches of all denominations and backgrounds.

Meet “Khan” in Central Asia

“If I leave, who will tell them about Isa [Jesus]? How can they learn about Him if not through me? The more brutally they beat me, the more I saw their need for loving Isa Massih.”

What has changed in Kazakhstan?

Even though Kazakhstan actually fell six spots on the World Watch List for the 2021 report, its persecution level for Christians was largely the same as in previous years. Its World Watch List rank indicates more of a general uptick in persecution across the world than a decrease of pressure or oppression for God’s people in the former Soviet republic.

Who is most vulnerable to persecution?

Converts from Islam are particularly vulnerable in Kazakhstan, as they bear the weight of persecution from their families and communities and they receive the general discrimination and pressure put on Christians by the government. Additionally, pressure on converts to Christianity is generally more intense in rural environments.

What does Open Doors do to help Christians in Central Asia?

Open Doors provides immediate aid to Central Asian believers when they are imprisoned, excluded from families and communities, and deprived of livelihood and employment because of their faith in Christ. Open Doors also strengthens the persecuted church in Central Asia primarily through literature and Bible distribution, Christian training, socio-economic projects and prayer support.

Population statistic: Johnson T M and Zurlo G A, eds., World Christian Database (Leiden/Boston: Brill, accessed February 2020).

Pray for Kazakhstan

  • Pray for Christians—and particularly for church leaders—in Kazakhstan who endure government suspicion and interference in their lives and faith. Pray they would be able to worship without impediment and that church leaders who are detained would be set free.
  • Pray for converts from Islam, that they would be protected from oppression and discrimination from their family, friends and community.
  • Pray God would work through the hearts of the leaders of Kazakhstan. The country has been a single-party government for decades, and control is tight. Ask that God would make known the truth of His Kingdom to the government of Kazakhstan.

Stories from Kazakhstan

May 11, 2021

Once a persecutor, now a Christ follower—former Muslim finds Jesus during Ramadan

Read More -

January 18, 2021

13 Christians murdered for following Jesus—every day

Read More -

September 20, 2020

Here’s how Muslims are coming to Christ—even during Islamic holy days

Read More -